INSIDE THE CROWDFUNDING CAMPAIGN TO REUNITE A FAMILY SEPARATED AT THE BORDER 

“In the time she was separated from her children, Gonzalez-Garcia only talked on the phone with them twice. This is in part because of limitations for when calls can be placed in detention, and difficulties connecting with the children’s caseworker. Calls are also prohibitively expensive—Gonzalez-Garcia was only able to call because her family in North Carolina was able to send her some money. The two calls that connected were three minutes each, and on one of them no one was able to speak—the entire family was crying too hard.”

QUEER EYE WILL TALK ABOUT RACE, RELIGION AND GENDER–BUT NOT ABOUT CLASS

“If ‘Queer Eye’ is ‘more than a makeover’” doesn’t that mean that someone at some point should acknowledge the socioeconomic obstacles people face to changing their homes, appearance and lives? Walmart, the site of this couple’s meet cute, is notorious for low wages, poor labor conditions and actively working against unionization. In Georgia, where the show is filmed, 1 in 5 children are living in poverty. A U.N. report released last week concluded that with 40 million people living in poverty, the United States is the most unequal developed nation in the world.”

LINKING LEARNING TO LIFE ON THE U.S./MEXICO BORDER

“When we reached the first water drop off site, we saw that a dozen bottles had been left by other volunteers, tucked in the shady nook of a tree branch. So we continued on toward a second stop, which required scaling a rock wall ten feet high. To do this, one person climbed first, then the group formed a chain to spot and help the next along. Those of us wearing heavy backpacks handed them up to others before climbing the wall. As I looked for small footholds and cracks, grabbing the arms outstretched from above, I was reminded of the precariousness of this path—often traveled in the heat of summer or the dark of night.”

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